Did Pixar Make Me Vegan?

We’ve all heard the famous line from Bruce the shark in Finding Nemo, “fish are friends, not food”, but is it just a line or is there more to it?

Films animated by Pixar Studios, though aimed at children, are known to be home to many more adult references too. These often come in the form of innuendo, a nod to the parents watching with their kids. But you can also find many allusions to themes that are purely innocent but are read differently by a younger and older audience.

Bruce’s character in Finding Nemo (2003) is a prime example of this. He starts a support group called The Fish-Friendly Sharks to help other sharks stop eating fish too. Their mantra is:

 “I am a nice shark, not a mindless eating machine. If I am to change this image, I must first change myself. Fish are friends, not food.”

Watching this back as an adult, it seems like a clear message on the consumption of fish. Although later in the film Bruce does become a slave to his carnal instincts as a shark, he is overall a seen as a good character, because he does not eat fish like other sharks do.

This same trope of the vegetarian shark is also seen in Dreamworks’ Shark Tale (2004), where Lenny also does not eat fish, which is seen as a weakness by the other sharks. There is even a scene where his father forces him to eat a prawn, in which the prawn is seen begging Lenny not to eat him.

 

 

While both of these examples could be said to have been included simply to make children not afraid of sharks, making them vegetarian begs the question of whether it was intentional. The idea of bringing these kinds of issues into children’s’ films is seen in other Dreamworks animations too, including Over The Hedge (2006). The two antagonists of this film are a bear, who is angry that their hibernation food was stolen and the other is an exterminator, or by extension, humans.

The entire plot revolves around woodland creatures not being able to scavenge for food because the humans have built more houses, cutting down their habitat. When they are caught attempting to steal food from human homes they are seen as “vermin” that need to be exterminated. It’s only natural for children to want to side with the cute animals that lead the story and many children would bring these ideas outside of the story.

One final example that perpetuates the ideas of a plant-based lifestyle is Aardman Animations’ film, Chicken Run (2000). It’s almost impossible to detach this film from a vegetarian agenda, given that an actual line from the film, is “I don’t want to be a pie!” spoken by an actual chicken. Here, the antagonists are the farmer, who are seen as murderers.

 

 

This framing of sentient and talking animals skews the perspective of the viewer to see them as more than “just food”. They are the heroes of the story, they provoke an emotional response from the audience and you are rooting for them to win. There’s been an increase in plant-based lifestyles within millennials and generation Z, people who grew up watching these sorts of movies. Is it possible that they did indeed have an impact on the way we view the world? Was this the intention?

Whether you are a vegetarian, vegan or meat-eater, the link between children’s media and the portrayal of animal welfare issues is unavoidable. There is far less media aimed at adults with this same message, packaged in an unobtrusive way. Maybe this is how the world becomes plant-based, through the innocence of animal protagonists, showing us that we are not as different as we think.

Do you think that these films made an impact on your meat consumption? Can you think of any other films that fit into this category? Let us know in the comments below or on our Facebook page!

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The Doctor’s a WOMAN??????

The 13th Doctor was cast a few weeks ago and it’s Jodie Whittaker, aka A WOMAN, how preposterous and deceitful.

You probably know of the sci-fi hit Doctor Who and you may also know that the Doctor has ALWAYS been cast as a man… From the very first Doctor, we have had many different men bring new things to the role, and it’s been mostly an absolute delight. The companions are often women and fall in love with the Doctor and it’s been the same for ages and when they change things the viewer count goes up but like that doesn’t mean anything because everyone is angry and that’s the truth of the matter.

The thing about sci-fi is, it has RULES. Like the fact that the Doctor has only 13 incarnations… And you can’t simply change those RULES with your new fangled feminism. These so-called “women” think they can take our stuff and make it theirs. It’s not like there are even any female viewers. Honestly, the new Doctor is a travesty and MILLIONS will stop watching.

The fact of the matter is, Jodie Whittaker WILL be terrible, RUIN the genre and set everything on FIRE.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again; the Doctor is AN ALIEN, so should be played by AN ALIEN. 

doctor who audition.jpg

Obviously, Alan is the best for this.

KIDDING!

This is the most trivial thing ever… Just watch the show and see what happens! Love ya Jodie!

What do YOU think about the casting? Let us know in the comments below or on our Facebook page!

Challenging Gender Constructs in Society

Why stick to gender norms in pop culture? What you wear is nobody else’s business, so why is it such a huge thing and why are so many negative stereotypes attached to what you wear?

This isn’t something I’d usually post about, but it’s such an important subject and is more relevant to media and pop culture than most things. I’d like to tell you a story, something that affects me and could well affect you. While I’m mainly talking about the female gender here, this counts for boys and whatever you identify as too! #GenderEquality

I am happy being female and I don’t at all question my gender, however, I feel that girls clothes are restrictive, what with popular culture depicting women as mainly skinny. Plus the fact that I’m short and not exactly slim means that any jeans are especially hard to find. So sometimes I’ll wear a guy’s hoodie or something, because I feel more comfortable.

Things like that I can away with, but there are some things I always felt I couldn’t wear.  One of these things is ties. I love ties. I own loads of them but I don’t have the confidence to wear them to college out of fear of what people will say. Last Wednesday however, I finally wore a tie outside.

My Tie Selfie

My Tie Selfie

This came about by me posting in a group I’m in on Facebook called StarKid Fans Unite. I found that I wasn’t the only one who wanted to wear a tie, so some other members and I decided to band together and all wear ties on that day. They say strength comes in numbers and now I know just how true it is.

TIE Jessica Aiken

Jessica’s Tie Selfie

TIE Emma Bates

Emma’s Tie Selfie

And yes, people did have things to say about my gender, but I am comfortable being who I am: a tie wearing female. I understand that it is hard not to take other people’s opinions to heart, but you must remember that what other’s think is not your fault in any way. If people are concerned about what you wear, something that doesn’t affect them in any way, that is their problem. And that goes for any of your lifestyle choices that are solely your own.

You don’t have to bend to social constructs; you are an individual, embrace who you are! I hope this article aids in helping to diffuse these constructs and if you have your own story to share, please leave it in the comments or tweet me, I’d love to hear them! Whatever the world throws at you, the best thing you can do is stay you, because you are awesome.